CCC Research Justice Announcement :: Call for Applications for CCC Research Justice in Washington County Fellowship

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Call for Applications: CCC Research Justice IN WASHINGTON COUNTY Fellowship

The Coalition of Communities of Color (CCC) is an alliance of 19 culturally specific organizations that come together to work for racial justice transformation in the region. We are proud of the work we have accomplished through our research justice, advocacy and leadership development programs in the racial justice movement.

The CCC is proud to announce our first Research Justice Fellowship to develop community leadership in data and research in order to build power, organize and advocate for racial justice in the region.  If you are interested in learning how to use research and data to build power and advocate for racial justice, this is the right opportunity for you. Learn more about our Research Justice vision here.

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What is the Research Justice Fellowship?

This program is designed to help community members learn how to design and implement small-scale research projects around issues that derive from their experiences with institutional racism. In the process, the cohort will give feedback and inform the creation of an online data tool called the Regional Equity Atlas that will hold the research they generate.

We will provide training, stipends, research expenses and the opportunity to create and implement research projects that create knowledge and build power to organize and advocate for change.

Our goal is to build a cohort of strong community leaders with an understanding of the role of research in organizing and advocacy for racial justice. The project is guided by a vision of research justice, which seeks to amplify and emphasize the voices of those most directly impacted by institutional racism – in particular, people of color – in the work of making our communities equitable.


Frequently Asked Questions

Does the fellowship pay?

  • Research Justice Fellows will receive a $,1000 stipend. CCC will cover costs for research-related expenses such as supplies (flipcharts, photocopies, printouts etc) and public transit/mileage reimbursement.

Are there geographical, age, education, or experience requirements?

  • The fellowship is open to everyone 18 years or older who identifies as a person of color.
  • There are no education, experience and immigration requirements.
  • Research Justice Fellows need to live or work or have a strong relationship to Washington County.

What are expectations from the program and the hours worked?

  • This is a 2 month program from Oct-Nov 2018 and it requires a 60 hour time commitment, which includes:
    • Participating in trainings on Oct 6-7, 2018
    • Implementing the research
    • Participating in the development of the online data tool
  • In the trainings, community researchers will develop a timeline of research implementation including scheduling check-ins with CCC for guidance, assistance and accountability in implementation of research in October and November.

How do I apply and ask other questions?

To apply or ask other questions, please fill out this simple application form to join the 2018 Community Researchers Program cohort. Applications are due by Monday, September 24, 2018. Up to 12 accepted applicants will receive email and phone notification and information no later than September 28, 2018. The trainings will take place on Saturday-Sunday October 6-7, 2018. Please send any questions to Shweta Moorthy, Researcher, at researchjustice@coalitioncommunitiescolor.org or call 217-621-2096.

CCC Job Announcement :: Office Manager

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Title:               OFFICE MANAGER
Status:             Full-time, exempt
Reports to:      Executive Director
Location:         Portland, Oregon

Position Overview

The Coalition of Communities of Color (CCC) seeks a highly organized and systems-oriented Office Manager to manage the administrative functions of the organization.  CCC is a member-driven organization that advocates for racial justice by addressing socioeconomic disparities, institutional racism, and inequity of services experienced by our families, children, and communities. The ideal candidate will have a combination of experience in developing and managing administrative systems, supporting executive staff, supporting financial functions, planning/managing events, and supporting logistics.

Formed in 2001, the CCC is an alliance of culturally-specific and pan-immigrant and refugee community-based organizations. The CCC supports a collective racial justice effort through policy analysis and advocacy, culturally-appropriate data and research, and leadership development in communities of color.  The Office Manager serves as the central administrative hub of the CCC managing all operational and administrative functions. The Office Manager reports to the Executive Director and works with CCC staff in the daily operations of the CCC.

Responsibilities

The general duties of the Office Manager include but are not limited to, the following and will evolve as the CCC continues to grow:

Support of the Executive Director (25%)

  • Organizes, schedules and manages meetings and appointments for the Executive Director. 
  • Support administrative tasks for the Executive Director including:  filing, email management, copying, material and meeting preparation, and tasks as requested.
  • Staffs board meetings by scheduling, agenda preparation, dissemination of materials, note taking and follow up communication.
  • Manage daily email activity
  • Assistance with fundraising event logistics and software support.
  • Other support duties as assigned.   

Office Management  (25%)

  • Organize and manage office operations and procedures
  • Responsible for managing office services by ensuring office operations and procedures are organized, correspondences are controlled, filing systems are designed, supply requisitions are reviewed and approved and that clerical functions are properly assigned and monitored
  • Establish a historical reference for the office by outlining procedures for protection, retention, record disposal, retrieval and staff transfers
  • Ensure office efficiency is maintained by carrying out planning and execution of equipment procurement, layouts and office systems
  • Responsible for developing and implementing office policies by setting up procedures and standards to guide the operation of the office
  • Ensure paper and electronic filing systems are maintained and current.
  • Maintain office equipment including computers, copier, fax, telephones, etc. 
  • Maintain and replenish inventory and office supplies
  • Manage relationships with vendors, service providers, and landlord, ensuring all items are paid on time.
  • Greet visitors and provide general support.

Organizational Communications Support (20%)

  • Manage the office to ensure effective telephone and mail communications both internally and externally and maintain professional image
  • Create email and social marketing communications 
  • Respond to incoming calls and general emails and direct to appropriate parties
  • Monitors and addresses all matters of organizational climate and culture;

Meeting Logistics (10%)

  • Actively supports meeting logistics to include planning, coordination of space rental, ; 
  • Schedule meetings in conference rooms as needed

Finance and Bookkeeping (20%)

  • Manage and coordinate all bookkeeping functions of the organization, including payroll preparation.  
  • Manage and track all administrative check requests and deposits.  
  • Establish monitor procedures for record keeping

Qualifications

The Office Manager should demonstrate experience and skills in balancing the five aforementioned primary work duty areas and should meet or exceed the following criteria:

  • Minimum 2 years office management, administrative or assistant experience
  • Knowledge of office management responsibilities, systems, and procedures
  • Excellent time management skills and ability to multi-task and prioritize
  • Attention to detail and problem-solving skills
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
  • Strong organization and planning skills
  • Proficient in MS Office and Gmail Suite
  • Knowledge of accounting, data and administrative management practices and procedures.
  • Knowledge of clerical practices and procedures. 
  • Commitment to racial justice and demonstrated ability to interact effectively with people from different cultures and experiences; ability to lead and work with cross-cultural environments and occasionally regionally diverse environments including rural communities
  • Ability to develop and build relationships with tribal communities, intergenerational communities, and others
  • Awareness of differences among vulnerable populations and the disparities faced by communities of color
  • Ability to learn and build on varying cultural and community norms of diverse CCC communities

Preferred Qualifications

Associates, Bachelors, or Masters degree in Administration, Organizational Development, Organizational Leadership, Business, Human Resources, or related fields.

Proficient in software packages related to bookkeeping, administration, statistics or related areas.

COMPENSATION

Starting salary is $40,000 – $50,000 depending on experience.  Paid time off is based on tenure with the organization and is generously accrued. We also provide medical, dental and vision insurance, a Flexible Spending Account, and Life Insurance. Employees may enroll in a 401k retirement plan with employer contribution after one year of employment. We provide an $80/month transportation stipend and a cellphone stipend.

TO APPLY

Please send a cover letter and resume via email to hr@coalitioncommunitiescolor.org. Please submit application materials byAugust 27, 2018 at 5:00pm.  

OPB Article :: Coalition Report Reveals Inequality In Washington County

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Coalition Report Reveals Inequality In Washington County

by Erica Morrison Follow OPB June 18, 2018 5:24 p.m. | Beaverton, Oregon

The Coalition of Communities of Color released their comprehensive report on racial inequities in Washington County on Monday.

“Leading With Race: Research Justice in Washington County” comes after two years of research, and explores the lived experiences of eight communities in Oregon’s most diverse county.

The report focuses on Native American, African-American, African, Asian and Asian-American, Latino, Middle Eastern and North African, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islanders and Slavic communities in Washington County.

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CCC presented the report to officials and community members at Beaverton Library. Attendees received a 31-page booklet of the study’s executive summary. The summary details the population sizes of the identified communities and addresses key issues that affect them.

The mayors of Hillsboro, Tigard and Beaverton community leaders spoke at the meeting. Rep. Suzanne Bonamici, D-Oregon, also delivered remarks.

Bonanmici said Washington County is the “economic engine” of the state and the struggle for equity has been long and is far from over.

The findings of the report prove that to be true.

Researcher Shweta Moorthy found Latino applicants are 125 percent more likely to have their home loan application denied compared to high income whites.

When asked what surprised her the most about her research, Moorthy replied, “How willing people were to get uncomfortable.”

The study confirms many things members of communities of color already know; there are greater disparities when it comes to homeownership, education and interactions with law enforcement.

The report includes an eight-step call to action to improve racial equity in the county.

Moorthy said she hopes the report gets people to realize the expertise of people of color and the need to respect that expertise.

CCC Organizational Announcement :: Environmental Justice Staff Transition at CCC

CCC Organizational Announcement :: Environmental Justice Staff Transition at CCC

Please join me in congratulating our Environmental Justice Manager, Maggie Tallmadge, on her next adventure! Maggie will be leaving the Coalition of Communities of Color (CCC) to attend the Yale School of Forestry and Environmental Studies to pursue a Master’s Degree in Environmental Management.

CCC Receives the IAP2 Cascade Best Practices Award Winner For Research Category!

The International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Cascade Chapter Selects the CCC for A Best Practices Award for "Leading with Race" Report

The Research Justice Center of the Coalition of Communities of Color (CCC) was nominated for an International Association for Public Participation (IAP2) Cascade Chapter Best Practices Award because of the "Leading With Race: Research Justice in Washington County". The selection committee received many outstanding nominations and it was a competitive evaluation process in which each nominee’s community engagement processes were held to high esteem through the lens of our IAP2 Core Values.

The CCC was selected as the IAP2 Cascade Best Practices Award Winner in the category of Research!

The Research Justice Center of the CCC will be presented with an award this Friday, June 22nd!

As a winner, the CCC will be recognized through the IAP2 Cascade Chapter and IAP2 USA e-newsletters, website, and through social media accounts. As part of this honor and selection, the CCC will be put forth for further consideration and compete for the national IAP2 Core Values Awards in 2019, as eligible.

June 2018 Equity Lens Newsletter

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Welcome to the June 2018 edition of the Equity Lens! In this edition, we are excited to announce our new executive director, provide updates on our work, and highlight the work of our members, partners, and community leaders.

HERE'S A QUICK OVERVIEW OF THIS EDITION OF THE EQUITY LENS:


Meet the CCC's New Executive Director

The Board of Directors of the Coalition of Communities of Color (CCC) are thrilled to announce the new Executive Director, Marcus C. Mundy.  Marcus will start on June 25th, 2018.

Marcus Mundy knows the CCC well, as a former Executive Director of a member organization and Executive Committee member, he was instrumental in the CCC’s publication of the Unsettling Profile series, and its ongoing advocacy for increased funding for housing and services for our culturally specific member organizations.

Marcus has a prolific career in leadership and is passionate about advancing racial justice in Oregon.  He has strong relationships and roots in our communities and will lead CCC into its next chapter with a deep understanding of and commitment to communities of color. 

About Marcus C. Mundy

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Mr. Mundy is a Principal at Mundy Consulting LLC, an Oregon state certified minority small business. His practice assists clients in various disciplines including but not limited to: achieving equity, diversity and inclusion in personnel, contracting, supplier diversity, development and administrative areas; and achieving compliance with respect to applicable laws, regulations and accreditation standards for healthcare businesses and others. 

Prior to his role at Mundy Consulting, Mr. Mundy served as the President and CEO of the Urban League of Portland, was the Vice President and Regional Compliance Officer for Kaiser Permanente Northwest, and has held a host of other leadership positions. 

Mr. Mundy attended Howard University in Washington, DC, receiving his Bachelor (BBA) in Business Administration, and attended Howard University's Graduate School of Business. He received his Master of Business Administration (MBA) degree from the University of Oregon’s Executive MBA program. 

Mr. Mundy has served the community through his participation on numerous boards and community advisory positions, including the OHSU Foundation Board, the State Labor Commissioner’s Oregon Council on Civil Rights, the Oregon Community Foundation’s Regional Advisory Initiative, the Coalition for a Livable Future,  EcoDistricts (formerly Portland Sustainability Institute) and, currently, Upstream Public Health. 

He is also a Senior Fellow in Oregon’s chapter of the American Leadership Forum, our state’s premier leadership training group for over two decades. His proudest achievement, however, and forever, is as a father to his four children.

Equity Lens Interview:

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1) You’ve had a long career in leadership roles, what is one accomplishment of which you are most proud? 

As a proponent of servant leadership, I am proud of the fact that I focus on the humanity of the people for whom I work, despite the setting. If a leader can maintain empathy, and remember that there is a responsibility to serve and not just direct, there will always be much for which to be proud.  Consistent empathy is the accomplishment I cherish the most, as it allows me to remember why I work.

2) What are you most excited about in your new role at the CCC? 

I am excited to work once again with a high quality, dedicated, professional staff, and an organization that is fiercely clear in its mission.  When a team is focused in its direction, great things can be accomplished.  I am absolutely eager to connect with past colleagues and meet new leaders in the enlarged membership of the Coalition and our many partners. There is much work to be done to advocate for and collaborate with member organizations, and I hope to be able to help our collective goals to be achieved.

I once opined at a fundraising dinner, over a decade ago, that if you were a salmon or a tree or a bicycle lane in Oregon you had a better chance of being protected and having resources thrown your way than if you were a person of color trying to find a job or housing or healthcare or redress to civil injustice. 

(Please understand that I am pro-salmon, pro-tree, and pro-cycling.  It is just that I am even more a proponent of racial equity and justice, basic civil rights and economic opportunity.  While the paradigm is not zero-sum, and we can accomplish many of these things simultaneously, I do believe that fairness for people must come first before we concentrate on addressing everything else.)

Much has changed for the good since my comments, in large part because of the relentless work of the Coalition and its members.

But an exciting facet of my new role is that I can remind the powers that be in this region that these issues remain current, must be addressed with urgency even now, and that the “new normal” we have become accustomed to (anesthetized by?) over the last two years is not normal at all, and must be met with resolute focus on change that benefits all.  I look forward to the challenge.

3) What do you like to do to maintain work/life balance? 

I love to read, I revel in writing, I relish wonderful food and discovering new places (both of which can be done abundantly in Oregon), and I embrace the opportunity to spend time with family and friends discussing issues of the day, and laughing out loud.  Watching my athletic children compete in their various sports endeavors has also helped keep me grounded over the years, and eased the stresses of the day-to-day.

4) Trailblazers or Timbers?

Is that a trick question?  I support each of those Portland treasures equally, although I do hope the Trailblazers prevail in signing LeBron James in the offseason (longshot), and the Timbers acquire the promising Tayo Edun (possible) in theirs.  That would make for an exciting next year.


Summer Soirée a success!

On behalf of the Coalition of Communities of Color, our members, our board of directors, and our staff, we would like to thank everyone that attended the 2018 Summer Soirée! This is the fourth year of our annual fundraiser and it was our most successful one yet! Pictures from the event will be posted soon, but here's a glimpse of the pictures from the program and a video about CCC's work that we featured at the event.

 Paul Lumley, Executive Director of NAYA Family Center & CCC Board Chair

Paul Lumley, Executive Director of NAYA Family Center & CCC Board Chair

 Stefan Saing, Civic Engagement Coordinator, IRCO Asian Family Center

Stefan Saing, Civic Engagement Coordinator, IRCO Asian Family Center

 Nichole June Maher, President of Northwest Health Foundation & Co-founder of the CCC, was the emcee for the evening.

Nichole June Maher, President of Northwest Health Foundation & Co-founder of the CCC, was the emcee for the evening.

 Shweta Moorthy, CCC Researcher, introducing  Leading with Race: Research Justice in Washington County

Shweta Moorthy, CCC Researcher, introducing Leading with Race: Research Justice in Washington County

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If you were not able to attend, but would like to support the work of the CCC, you can still make a donation and help us advance racial justice through cross-cultural collective action. 


Research Justice Update

CALL FOR PARTICIPANTS IN WASHINGTON COUNTY

On June 12th, the Coalition’s Research Justice Center will publish and release Leading with Race: Research Justice in Washington County. This report is based on the Center’s community-based participatory research project, which reflects the lives and aspirations of communities of color in Washington County. Leading with Race includes findings that our leaders can rely upon to build capacity,  mobilize and advocate for better outcomes for culturally-specific communities in Washington County.     

The next phase of the project entails providing an opportunity for community members living/working in Washington county to learn how to present research findings, facilitate dialogue and articulate their experiences to city councils, school districts, community-based organizations and so on. This is an important leadership development opportunity, particularly for those who live, work, and or have spent a significant part of their life in Washington County.

The CCC’s Research Justice Center and Advocacy Program will host a training for interested individuals sometime between the end of June and mid-July. Childcare and food will be provided during the workshop. Please contact Shweta Moorthy by June 19 if you wish to participate in this leadership development opportunity. Learn more about CCC’s Research Justice vision here.

 Click on the image to download the report

Click on the image to download the report

Re-launching Regional Equity Atlas

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The CCC’s Research Justice Center has taken the lead in re-launching Regional Equity Atlas in partnership with Ecotrust, Futurewise and 1000 Friends of Oregon. Currently in development, the Regional Equity Atlas 3.0 will include an online mapping tool and interpretive website, which will enable us to understand how well different neighborhoods, communities, and populations across our region are able to access the resources and opportunities they need to meet their basic needs and advance their health and well-being. We will not collect, analyze, and present data for its own sake – instead, the Regional Equity Atlas is designed to be a tool to catalyze lasting social change, and to support grassroots community organizing toward that end.

The Coalition will resource and train a cohort of 12-15 community members living in Washington County to design and implement small-scale research projects and co-develop the Regional Equity Atlas. The cohort will begin meeting in July 2018. Please contact Shweta Moorthy by June 19 if you wish to participate in this leadership development and community-based research opportunity.


Advocacy Update

The Portland and Multnomah County budget cycle and May elections made for a busy spring in CCC’s advocacy efforts. City and county budget advocacy has been a core element of CCC's work since the coalition’s inception. This year, we are exploring a new approach aimed at deepening relationships with local elected leaders and creating a broader vision for racial equity in our community. Since January, CCC has begun a series of quarterly meetings with the Portland mayor and Multnomah County chair to share our members’ policy and budget priorities in a cross-cultural context.

 Tony Defalco (Verde), Dañel Malan (Milagro Theater), and CCC members providing testimony.

Tony Defalco (Verde), Dañel Malan (Milagro Theater), and CCC members providing testimony.

In addition to this new strategy, we partnered again this year with CCC member IRCO to host a Multnomah County Budget Forum focused on the priorities of communities of color. All five county commissioners heard from service providers, advocates, and community members about priority issues and the importance of culturally specific resources, with a number of CCC members testifying in person.

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In the run-up to the May 15 election, we worked to increase engagement on racial equity in local races. On April 30, CCC teamed up with 1000 Friends of Oregon to host the only forum for all Metro Council candidates. Allan Lazo of the Fair Housing Council of Oregon was an outstanding moderator as candidates discussed their visions for Metro's work in racial equity, housing, transportation, and land use. The event was held at the Muslim Educational Trust's Community and Educational Center in Tigard; MET is CCC's newest member and we were delighted to hold this event in their beautiful space.

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In line with our increased engagement in Washington County, CCC co-hosted a Washington County District Attorney Candidate Forum with the ACLU of Oregon and CCC member organization Unite Oregon. District attorneys are one of the most powerful actors in the criminal justice system, and this forum was an opportunity to center racial justice in these conversations. Shujat Qalbani of Unite Oregon drew on his own experience as a criminal justice policy advocate, prosecutor, and municipal judge to serve as moderator.

Now that election season and the budget cycle are over, we’ll be busy planning for advocacy on November ballot initiatives and the 2019 legislative session and look forward to creating a robust policy agenda and engaging in collective action for racial equity.


Energy Justice Update

June 1st marked one year since the City of Portland and Multnomah County passed a 100% Renewable Energy Resolution. Portland City Council and the Multnomah County Board of Commissioners adopted companion 100% renewables resolutions, establishing goals to meet 100% of community-wide energy needs with renewable energy by 2050 and to meet 100% of community-wide electric energy needs through renewable energy by 2035.

The Coalition of Communities of Color, Verde, OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon and partners successfully advanced equity commitments to protect low-income ratepayers, support workforce diversity and target businesses, and incent community-based development of renewable energy infrastructure. Specifically, each resolution prioritizes “community-based development of renewable energy infrastructure,” and sets a target of supplying 2% of community-wide energy needs via such infrastructure by 2035.

While Oregon has been recognized as an environmental leader, communities like ours-- communities of color and low-income communities-- are often left out of the development, implementation, and enforcement of such initiatives and bypassed by the environmental, social and economic wealth created through the environmental and sustainability movement. We are on a path to reverse that on the local and state level.  

In July, organizations and communities of color will build a collective understanding of energy development fundamentals and energy democracy, including how the fossil-fuel economy is an integrated climate and economic crisis which has disproportionately impacted low-income communities and communities of color. Using the capacity building of the “Community Energy Justice Summit” as a foundation, we explore what a long-term community-driven effort could look like that develops and implements community-based renewable energy resources and policies, thereby empowering our communities to realize environmental, economic, racial, and social justice benefits.

Since late 2017, the CCC has participated in the SB 978 [link: http://www.puc.state.or.us/Pages/Energy%20Initiatives/SB-978.aspx] process, including ongoing capacity building and advocacy to ensure the Public Utilities Commission integrates Environmental Justice, public participation, and climate change mitigation into its decision-making framework. We are simultaneously working to establish long-term intervenor funding for Environmental Justice groups. We believe this is an enormous opportunity to develop our communities as stakeholders in energy policy and shift the utility business model to center the needs of communities of color and low-income communities.

How will we build this new, regenerative, and cooperative future? Organizations like the CCC, APANO, NAYA, Verde, and NAACP Portland Chapter are moving forward models to transition from the old, extractive economy and fund a clean, equitable and racially just economy. The Portland Clean Energy Fund is Portland's chance to become a national model for transitioning our city to renewable energy in a manner that directly supports racial justice and equity. From funding new rooftop solar and energy efficiency projects to a robust job-training program for underserved communities, PCEF is how we can turn our values into tangible benefits for Portlanders and our climate. The initiative would levy a small surcharge on huge multinational corporations to capitalize a fund that will be directed to clean energy and climate investments that benefits low-income people and people of color (among other traditionally underserved communities). Find out more here about the ballot initiative campaign [link: https://www.portlandcleanenergyfund.com/] and check out the crowdfunding campaign [https://www.crowdpac.com/campaigns/385855/help-portland-clean-energy-fund-initiative-qualify-for-the-nov-2018-ballot], which will fund efforts to get the Portland Clean Energy Fund on the ballot in November!

Check out similar efforts and gain inspiration nationally through the Energy Democracy National Tour 2018 [link: https://energydemocracy.us/]. The Tour leverages the recently published book, Energy Democracy: Advancing Equity in Clean Energy Solutions, to strengthen, bring together, and expand the various strands and networks of the emerging energy democracy movement in the United States.

June 2018 Leaders Bridge eNewsletter

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IN THIS EDITION OF LEADERS BRIDGE

Welcome to the June edition of the Leaders Bridge, CCC’s bi-monthly newsletter highlighting our leaders, events, and opportunities brought to you by the Bridges Leadership Initiative, our members and key partners. Given the abundance of spectacular events, celebrations and career and placement opportunities, we are so excited for this edition of the newsletter! The next edition is scheduled for mid-August. Members and Key Partners who are interested in sharing events and opportunities are invited to submit requests to: Nakisha@CoalitionCommunitiesColor.org.


Alumni Spotlights

Jacqueline "Jackie" Lueng, Asian Pacific Islander Community Leadership Institute (API-CLI)

 New Salem City Councilor Jackie Leung

New Salem City Councilor Jackie Leung

Jacqueline “Jackie” Leung is an active member of her community and graduate of the Asian Pacific Islander Community Leadership Institute (API-CLI). She is also a mother, community organizer, chairperson, supervisor to community health workers, and beginning in January 2019, Salem City Councilor! Jackie earned her Juris Doctorate from Willamette University College of Law. She also has a Masters of Science in Community and Behavioral Health from the University of Iowa College of Public Health. 

Jackie is a graduate of the 4th cohort of the API-CLI program. She was drawn to the program because she wanted to strengthen her organizing and advocacy skills as a means to address human rights, immigration justice, and diversity, equity and inclusion—especially with members of Asian and Pacific Islander communities. While working on a project focused on Community Organizing with her API-CLI cohort, Jackie learned to build community partnerships and effective team building strategies with a diverse leadership group. 

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Jackie combines her knowledge of the law, health, and community organizing with her API-CLI experience to meet the health needs of the Micronesian Islander community and members of the community who identify as persons of color. She works with communities as a Community Health Worker Supervisor and Board Chair at the Micronesian Islander Community, an organization that promotes leadership, social justice, and preservation of the Micronesian Islander culture. Jackie also works as a Community Organizer with the Asian Pacific American Network of Oregon.

Ms. Leung continues her civic engagement as an active member and supporter to several nonprofits and government entities including the Hunger-Free Leadership Institute; a member of Salem Mayor’s International Council; Commissioner of the City of Salem’s Human Rights and Relations Advisory Commission; Commissioner with the Oregon Commission on Asian and Pacific Islander Affairs; and the Oregon Hunger Task Force.  She also participated in the Developing Equity Leadership through Training and Action (DELTA) program facilitated by the Oregon Health Authority’s Office of Equity and Inclusion.


Stefan Saing, Asian Pacific Islander Community Leadership Institute (API-CLI)

 Stefan Saing, Co-Lead, API-CLI

Stefan Saing, Co-Lead, API-CLI

Last year, Stefan Saing not only graduated from the Asian Pacific Islander Community Leadership Institute (API-CLI), he also became a co-lead for the program! He was born to Cambodian immigrants who came to America in during the late 70s and early 80s. He graduated from Oregon State University with a Bachelor's of Science degree, majoring in Microbiology and a minor in Chemistry. He was regularly involved with the Cambodian Student Association and other student groups in college. Following a volunteer mission to Cambodia in 2013, he shifted from his focus in medicine and became interested in public health policy and education. His work has ranged from coaching youth basketball to tutoring in the sciences to community involvement. 

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The API-CLI program was meaningful to him for many reasons, including its role is empowering Asian communities. The 2016 Cohort he was part of explored and developed leadership opportunities to support and advocate for increased civic engagement; build collaborative alliances among API communities and other communities of color in the greater Portland metropolitan region; and, focused on identifying and working towards rectifying racial and ethnic disparities.

Stefan endeavors to develop a community where younger generations are able to thrive under strong leaders. He envisions a future where these youths become leaders that represent Asian and Pacific Islander communities, along with numerous historically underserved communities he and his peers collaborate among. Stefan seeks to inspire people of all backgrounds to find a role and add their own strengths to their communities.

Stefan’s civic leadership includes shaping goals and outcomes of Metro’s Southwest Corridor Equitable Development Strategy (SWEDS) via his appointment to the SWEDS Project Oversight Committee; serving as member of the Board of Directors with the Cambodian American Community of Oregon; acting as a Cambodian Community Liaison for the Community Engagement Liaison Services); and part of the Planning Committee for the Cambodian, Lao, Thai, and Burmese New Year in the Park event held in Glenhaven Park annually.


Coalition, Member & Bridges Events

CCC's Summer Soirée

When: Tuesday, June 12th, 2018; 5:30PM
Where: Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark Street, Portland, OR 97214
Details: Together we're building the power of our communities for racial justice across cultures. Summer Soirée is our chance to come together as one community for an evening of conversation, idea sharing and inspiration.

Staff of CCC Member Organizations ’and Bridges Leaders can purchase tickets for $35. Use “Member” code to purchase tickets ONLY if you are a staff member or leader from a Bridges Leadership Development program.

Bridges alumni are also welcome and encouraged to attend as volunteers, who can attend free of charge. Please contact Nakisha to sign up for volunteer opportunities. Nakisha@coalitioncommunitiescolor.org.

For questions, contact Kodey Park Bambino at kodey@coalitioncommunitiescolor.org or (503) 200-5722


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Hacienda’s 20th Annual Latino Home Fair

When: Saturday, June 9th, 2018; 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
Where: Madison High School | 27354 NE 82nd Avenue, Portland OR 97220
Details: Don’t miss out on this great opportunity to take advantage of all the resources CCC member Hacienda has to offer: meet real estate and mortgage professionals, learn more about products and services available to make your home buying experience a success. This is a family-friendly event with a designated kids’ area! For more information, see the Hacienda Website - Facebook Event - or Instagram

** For more events listings, visit the Bridges Events Website **


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When: June 16th, 2018; Parade, 11 AM to noon; Celebration, 12:30 to 6 PM
Where: Parade starts at Safeway NE MLK & Ainsworth; the Celebration is located at Legacy Emanuel Hospital Field (N. Vancouver & N. Russell)
Details: Juneteenth, also known as Juneteenth Independence Day or Freedom Day, is a holiday that commemorates the June 19, 1865 announcement of the abolition of slavery and the emancipation of African American slaves. Juneteenth commemorates when U.S. soldiers brought word of President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation to Galveston, Texas, two years after it was issued. It is the oldest celebration of the end of slavery in the United States. In Oregon, Juneteenth OR Celebration was founded 45 years ago by the late and beloved community leader Clara Peoples. The celebration starts with a parade, followed by the festivities which include live music, art, food, educational booths, cultural booths, and a children’s play area.


When: Sunday, June 17th 10 AM to 3 PM
Where: The parade begins at the North Park Blocks and ends at Tom McCall Waterfront Park. 
Details: On Sunday, June 17th from 10am-3pm Latino Network will be participating in the Portland Pride Parade! You are invited to walk with us as we join our fellow Latinx and LGBTQ+ communities to support equality for all! This year, we have a truck, music, traditional folk dancers, and so much more! Light refreshments, pan dulce and snacks will be available. It’s going to be a party, so bring your family and friends for this amazing event! For more information visit the Parade FAQ site.


Good in the Hood, with SEI Inc and Urban League Portland

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When: Saturday, June 23rd, 2018; 11 AM to 10 PM
Where: King School Park, NE 6th Ave & NE Humboldt St Portland, OR 97211
Details: CCC Members Self Enhancement, Inc. and Urban League are proud sponsors and participants of the 26th annual Good in the Hood Festival and parade. Good in the Hood is one of the largest multicultural festivals in the Pacific Northwest and seeks to connect people with resources and experiences that strengthen unity in the community. The parade starts at 11 AM Saturday, June 23rd at Dawson Park and goes to King School Park. The Good in the Hood festival will have activities all weekend at King School Park: Friday 6pm-10pm; Saturday 11am-10pm; Sunday 12pm-8pm


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When: Saturday, June 30, 2018; 11:00 AM-4 PM
Where: Cully Park Grand Opening
You are invited to the Grand Opening Celebration for the long-awaited Cully Park in Portland's Cully Neighborhood. This FREE event includes food, games, and activities for all ages. Cully Park is the culmination of a partnership between Verde, a Cully based non-profit that serves communities by building environmental wealth, and Portland Parks & Recreation to turn a landfill into a 25-acre park in one of Portland’s most park-deprived neighborhoods. Bring the family, spend time with your neighbors, and help us celebrate this incredible park. We hope to see you there!

Celebración de apertura del parque Cully / el 30 de junio 2018 de 11:00am-4pm. Te invitamos a la gran celebración de apertura del largamente esperado parque Cully en el vecindario de Cully en Portland. Este evento GRATUITO incluye aperitivos, juegos, y actividades para todas las edades, incluyendo:

El parque Cully es la culminación de la colaboración entre Verde, que es una organización sin fines de lucro en Cully que sirve a comunidades por medio de crear vitalidad económica y ambiental, y el departamento de parques y recreación de Portland al transformar un basurero en un parque de 25 acres, en uno de los vecindarios con menos áreas verdes en la ciudad. Ven con tu familia, comparte con tus vecinos y celebramos juntos la apertura de este increíble parque. ¡Te esperamos allí


When: Saturday, August 11, 2018; 12 PM-8:30 PM
Where: Pioneer Courthouse Square, 701 SW 6th Ave Portland, OR 97205
Details: The Urban League of Portland is proud to support this year’s festival, which will bring over 5,000 Pan Africans and supporters in Oregon to Portland’s Pioneer Courthouse Square for a day to enjoy live music, dance, food and entertainment, health education, education and career awareness, financial literacy, and relevant other opportunities for people to get involved and take action to solve problems in their community.

 

** For more events listings, visit the Bridges Events Website **


Committee Placement Opportunities

Join the Grant Selection Committee for Metro’s Investment and Innovations Grants | Time Sensitive

The Grants Manager is currently seeking up to 3 community members for this committee. The seats are open to all of our Bridges Leaders, including Metro Community Partnership Pilot participants, and Leaders who worked on the Regional Waste Plan. Interested leaders should immediately contact Nakisha@CoalitionCommunitiesColor.org, please include Metro Grant Selection Committee in the subject of your email.


Join the City of Portland’s Human Rights Commission 

The Commission is currently accepting applications for membership! The Human Rights Commission works to eliminate discrimination and bigotry, to strengthen inter-group relationships, and to foster greater understanding, inclusion and justice for those who live, work, study, worship, travel and play in the City of Portland. In doing so, the Commission is guided by the principles embodied in the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights.

The Commission is comprised of 15 members representing a broad spectrum of the community. Members must live, work, worship, or be enrolled in school within the City of Portland. 

The Commission encourages applications from youth and students for up to two positions on the Commission. Human Rights Commissioners are appointed by the Portland City Council and are volunteers who work without compensation. Applications can be submitted via MSWord, or a fillable PDF form. For additional details regarding this opportunity, see the description on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Site.


Port of Portland’s PDX Community Advisory Committee (PDX CAC)

The Coalition of Communities of Color is hosting the Port of Portland’s Environmental Justice seat for their PDX Community Advisory Committee. 

The PDX CAC is an advisory body to the Port of Portland, City of Portland, and City of Vancouver. The mission of this ongoing advisory committee is to:

  • Support meaningful and collaborative public dialogue and engagement on airport-related planning and development;
  • Provide an opportunity for the community to inform the airport-related decision-making of the Port, the City of Portland, and other jurisdictions/organizations in the region; and
  • Raise public knowledge about the airport and impacted communities. 
  • A key focus of the committee will be to work towards assuring that PDX and the Airport Plan District become the most sustainable in the world recognizing the long-term, critical interconnection between economic development, environmental stewardship, and social responsibility.

The PDX CAC meets four times a year at Portland International Airport, usually on Wednesdays, from noon- 3:30 pm. Parking is paid and lunch is provided. The next meeting is on Thursday, June 14, 2018. Interested candidates are welcome to attend this meeting as members of the public. Interested leaders should contact Nakisha@CoalitionCommunitiesColor.org, and use PDX CAC Inquiry in the subject line of their email.


Career & Funding Opportunities

Employment Opportunities

Equity Training and Education Program Coordinator with the Office of Equity and Human Rights
The City of Portland's Office of Equity & Human Rights (OEHR) is looking for an Equity Training and Education Program Coordinator to join their team! The Equity Training and Education Program Coordinator is responsible for creating, managing, and developing equity training and education activities, targeting all City staff and elected officials. The program provides training to all City staff on how to cultivate an Equity Mindset and understand how to use an equity thought process in their work. The training program primarily centers on racial equity and disability equity. 

This position will be responsible for supporting program goals and objectives; Will work closely with the City Tribal Liaison in the Office of Government Relations to design training contents and facilitate training sessions that are specific to Tribal history and culture, tribal governance, treaties, and law. Co-develop strategies and best practices toward improving engagement and working with the Portland American Indian/Alaska Native community. For more details about this job opportunity, see the description on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Site.

Neighborhood Housing (NH) Manager with the Portland Housing Bureau
The Portland Housing Bureau is recruiting for a Neighborhood Housing (NH) Manager responsible for providing comprehensive planning and coordination of homeownership, home repair, and homeowner retention programs within the Portland Housing Bureau (PHB).  The NH Program Manager leads the team in the development and implementation of programs, City and Bureau policy, and partnerships with non-profit partners to assist in providing related services in the community.

The position oversees high-level compliance activities to ensure programs and resources are effective in creating opportunities to help communities with lower rates of home buying access and retain the benefits of homeownership.  This includes, but is not limited to budgeting, tracking and evaluating program performance against established goals, and working with community partners in identifying and implementing new strategies to increase homeownership for low-income households and help homeowners at risk of displacement to retain their homes. For more details about this job opportunity, see the description on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Site.

Executive Director of the Oregon Center for Public Policy
If you are a strategic thinker, someone who loves public policy, and a fighter for economic justice, this position may be right for you. The Oregon Center for Public Policy (OCPP or the Center), the leading public policy research institute in Oregon, seeks an Executive Director with a passion for advancing progressive state fiscal and economic policies that benefit all Oregonians. The Executive Director will oversee the Center’s high-quality research and analysis work; manage staff and operations including leading fundraising; maintain and build coalitions to advance strategic economic agendas; advise the legislature, state government, political influencers, and the public on priority issues; and ensure that the organization has the resources and support to achieve the mission. For more details about this job opportunity, see the description on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Site.

Homeownership Coordinator at the Native American Youth and Family Center
This position is part of the Native American Youth and Family Center Community Development Department’s Housing to Homeownership Program. The Homeownership Coordinator will work in collaboration with other agency programs to provide support to potential homeowners in Portland’s Native American community. This position is responsible for providing culturally specific and HUD-approved homeownership coaching and homebuyer education workshops for low- to moderate-income program participants. The coach helps buyers identify their goals and needs, evaluates individual financial situations and homeownership goals in order to provide the appropriate resources and educational support. Budget oversight, direct participant service and case management, regular workshop coordination, and event coordination are fundamental activities of this position. This position will play an administrative leadership role with the Minority Homeownership Assistance Collaborative, a coalition of affordable housing agencies collaborating together to deliver programmatic services. 

For more details about this job opportunity, see the description on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Site.

Cully Boulevard Alliance District Manager with the Native American Youth and Family Center
The Native American Youth and Family Center (NAYA) is looking for a motivated, organized, creative, and resourceful individual to serve as its Cully Boulevard Alliance District Manager. The Cully Boulevard Alliance (CBA) exists to promote and foster opportunity for economic prosperity that embraces diversity, nurtures community, and empowers Cully residents. Our shared vision is to see community-rooted businesses forming, growing, and thriving in a diverse neighborhood committed to serving and responding to the hopes and dreams of its residents. The CBA District Manager will oversee community economic development primarily targeted on NE Cully Boulevard between NE Freemont and NE Killingsworth St., one of the Prosper Portland Neighborhood Prosperity Initiative Zones. For more details about this job opportunity, see the description on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Site.

Grant and Contracts Accountant at Latino Network
Latino Network seeks a mission-driven professional with proven nonprofit and community experience to provide finance support. This is a roll-up-your-sleeves position with the capacity to impact the lives of Latino youth and their families. If you are caring, resourceful, outcome-orientated and able to build strong relationships, then Latino Network is the place for you.

Primary responsibilities consist of financially coordinating a portfolio of agency contracts and private grants by ensuring the accuracy of accounting codings, ensuring costs are allowable, completing monthly invoicing in a timely fashion, and adjusting budgets as necessary. All tasks to be performed in accordance with Generally Accepted Accounting Principles and agency policies and procedures. For more details about this job opportunity, see the description on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Site.

Communications Development Associate with the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO)
The Communications Development Associate will work with the Development Coordinator and Director of Development & Communications to carry out public relations/communication strategies that enhance IRCO’s public image including coordination of IRCO’s policy and advocacy efforts and additional tasks associated with the Development team. This position will play a key role in writing, producing, and disseminating agency-wide marketing materials and communications to diverse audiences. This position will participate in meetings, training, and committees to support IRCO’s goals and objectives. 

For more details about this job opportunity, see the description on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Site.

** For more job listings, visit the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Website**


Funding Opportunities 

Announcement: Metro Central Community Enhancement Grant program

The Metro Central enhancement grants program has begun accepting applications, they are due in September. This program supports residents within a target area that stretches along the west side of the Willamette River from the Northwest Neighborhood Association to Linnton, along with an area around the St. Johns Bridge within North Portland’s Cathedral Park neighborhood. Grants are awarded on an annual basis by the Metro Central Enhancement Committee, made up of representatives from the surrounding neighborhoods, businesses and environmental community. In 2018, the Metro Central Community Enhancement Committee funded 12 local improvement projects totaling $246,717.


Leadership Opportunities

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BPS Listening Session
The City of Portland Bureau of Planning and Sustainability (BPS) will host a listening session on Thursday, June 21 to hear from individuals interested in providing or expanding services in Portland’s waste and recycling industry. BPS wants to hear about experiences, challenges, and ideas for change. The event will include food, drinks, a $50 gift certificate, and interpretation services upon early request.

BPS is committed to increasing accessibility for people of color in Portland’s waste and recycling industry. BPS wants to understand barriers to entry and identify steps to reduce those barriers. BPS is specifically seeking participation from communities that may have experienced barriers to entering the waste and recycling industry, including women, communities of color, immigrant communities, the LGBTQ+ community, and all faith or religious communities. No documentation or validation of participants’ identity will be requested.
Interested?
Please contact Alfredo Gonzalez at alfredo.gonzalez@portlandoregon.gov or 503-823-8330 by June 13 at 5 p.m. Limited number of gift certificates available. The listening session will be held Thursday, June 21 from 5:30 p.m. to 7:30 p.m. in East Portland. The City of Portland is committed to providing meaningful access. For accommodations, modifications, translation, interpretation or other services, contact 503-823-7700, the TTY at 503-823-6868 or the Oregon Relay Service at 711. For additional information see the attached flyer.

Portland Harbor Public Forum
The Environmental Protection Agency is holding its first quarterly Portland Harbor Public Forum on Wednesday, June 13th2018  where community members can learn about current and planned work at the Portland Harbor Superfund site. You can find the most current information about the Public Forum at the Portland Harbor cleanup website.RSVPonly if you would like to receive event reminders. You do not need to RSVP in order to attend.
Time:  6:00-8:30 PM*
Location:  Immigrant Refugee and Community Organization (IRCO); Sokhom Tauch Community Room (or Community Center); 10301 NE Glisan St.; Portland, OR 97220
*Food from Tamale Boy will be provided by the Pre-Remedial Design Group and will be served on a first-come, first-served basis. Gluten-free and vegetarian options will be available. You are encouraged to arrive early to make sure you have food before the meeting starts promptly at 6 PM.

What will I learn at the Portland Harbor Public Forum?
EPA and ODEQ, other agencies and Potentially Responsible Parties will give an update on the status of the cleanup. Topics of the meeting will include:

  • Overview of the site from EPA and ODEQ
  • Updates from Potentially Responsible Parties
  • Fish Advisory update

For more information: Website:  www.epa.gov/superfund/portland-harbor; Contact Laura Knudsen, Community Involvement Coordinator (knudsen.laura@epa.gov, 206-553-1838)

Language Interpretation:
Do you or someone you know needs language interpretation? Please contact Laura Knudsen by May 30, 2018 (knudsen.laura@epa.gov, 206-553-1838).

Póngase en contacto con Laura Knudsen (knudsen.laura@epa.gov, 206-553-1838) antes del 30 de mayo si necesita servicios de interpretación.

Vui lòng liên lạc Laura Knudsen (knudsen.laura@epa.gov, 206-553-1838) trước ngày 30 tháng 5 nếu bạn cần dịch vụ thông dịch.

Fadlan la soo xiriir Laura Knudsen (knudsen.laura@epa.gov, 206-553-1838) kahor 30-tii May haddii aad u baahan tahay adeegyada tarjumaadda.


Community Events

Wednesday, 6/6: Queer APIs + Mental Health Roundtable
When: Wednesday, June 6, 2018; 6 PM to 8 PM
Where: Taborspace
Details: This panel and roundtable discussion will invite guest speakers to share thoughts on contemporary issues facing people who identify as queer and API. How do we navigate API spaces as queer people? How do we navigate queer spaces as API people? What areas present conflict or othering, and how do they impact health and approaches to self-care? Participants will be encouraged to listen, reflect, and share experiences and resources as they are comfortable.  

Portland Rose Festival Parade
When: Saturday, June 9th, 2018; 10 AM to 2 PM
Where: Memorial Coliseum to Downtown Portland; Location Map
Details: This popular procession is more than a spectacular floral-filled parade; it’s a beloved annual tradition. For more than 100 years, Portland families, visitors and community groups have been making memories at the Spirit Mountain Casino Grand Floral Parade. A colorful reflection of local, regional and international communities, the parade draws hundreds of thousands of cheering viewers of every age, along a 4-mile route that winds through city streets and across the river. The 2018 Spirit Mountain Casino Grand Floral Parade will begin at 10:00 a.m. on June 9.

Wakily | Kúkátónón 2018 Showcase
When: 
Saturday, June 9, 2018; 6:30 PM to 8 PM
Where: Jefferson High School
Details: Kúkátónón performers feature West African dance and drumming, a special ballet presentation, and guest performances by Habiba Addo [Ghanaian storytelling and vocals], Habib Iddrisu [Ghanaian drumming], and Obo Addy Legacy Project [Ghanaian drumming and dancing].

Whitenoise Project 14: Svay / Do / Alluri / Tolentino
When: Friday, June 15, 2018; 7 PM to 9 PM
Where: Milepost 5; 850 NE 81st Ave, Portland, OR 97213
Details:This June the Whitenoise project for our second event in the De-Canon Residency and Pop Up Library is excited to host powerhouse out of town poets Sokunthary Svay, Do Ngyuen Mai and Hari Alluri as they visit our fair city, as well as local favorite Armin Tolentino! The Whitenoise Project is a reading and discussion series aiming to center voices from underrepresented communities (PoC, Queer, Femme, WoC and people with disabilities), and is supported by a Jade-Midway Placemaking Grant from APANO.

Invisible Spectrum Stories – Belonging – A Pride Special
When: Monday, June 18, 2018; 8pm-11pm
Where: 116 NE Russell Street
Details: Invisible Spectrum Stories is back for 4 shows this year! We kick off our first show of 2018 in Pride month, featuring storytellers from our community workshop and LGBTQ storytellers. Invisible Spectrum stories features storytellers of color in Portland, and our theme is IDENTITY. Claiming it back. Finding it. Discovering it. Seeing it from the other side. Seeing someone else’s identity. Who are we. And choosing who I am. 

Healing the Fractures: Writing from Deep Experience
When: Saturday, June 23, 2018; 11:30am-3pm
Where:Milepost 5; 850 NE 81st Ave, Portland, OR 97213
Details: How do we overcome cultural silences around mental health in communities of color? How do we move away from the perception that we are broken and in need of fixing? Using generative writing exercises, we will mine memory, family history, and fractured narratives of the self to build writing practices rooted in compassion and imagination. Open to all levels of writers. 

My People’s Market
When:
Saturday, June 30th; 12pm-8pm
Where:300 N Winning Way
Details:Bring your friends and family to explore the diverse entrepreneurial talent of Portland at this FREE annual event. Support the community and shop at over 80 local multicultural businesses, talk with vendors, and network with local business owners of color. There will be live music, art, performances, and of course, plenty to eat and drink from some of Portland’s best eateries. 

May 2018 Leaders Bridge eNewsletter

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IN THIS EDITION OF LEADERS BRIDGE

  • CCC Staff Update - New Leadership Development Director

  • Alumni Spotlights

  • Coalition, Member & BRIDGES Events

  • Community Events

  • Leadership Opportunities

  • Career and Funding Opportunities

Welcome to the May edition of the Leaders Bridge, a bi-monthly enewsletter highlighting our leaders, events, and opportunities brought to you by the Bridges Leadership Initiative, our members, and key partners.


CCC Staff Update - New Leadership Development Director

I joined the Coalition and the Bridges Leadership Development Initiative as the new Leadership Development Director two months ago. Within a few weeks of starting, the Bridges team introduced me to their programs and helped set the stage for the Annual Bridges Leadership Convening held on March 10th.  It was great to get to see so many powerful leaders so soon after starting with the Coalition. If you weren’t able to make it, find out more about this meaningful, informative, and fun event, HERE!!

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March’s convening is just one of a number of leadership development projects underway.  In the next few months be on the lookout for updates on the following:

  • CCC will continue to develop and utilize tools within the Bridges Directory to share more opportunities for leaders to network, support and learn from one another, access meaningful jobs, and find opportunities to apply for placement on boards councils and commissions.
  • CCC will host and facilitate more opportunities for cross-cultural understanding and leadership development, which so many alumni expressed interest in last month;
  • CCC will continue to sustain and enhance our partnerships with Metro and Multnomah County; and,

Bridges Directory

The Bridges Directory is an online platform for Bridges alumni and participants to share their skills and interests with each other and with trusted partners who value our leaders and are committed to equity. If you are a current cohort member or Bridges Alumni, you can set up or update your profile here. The directory is not only a place to highlight your experience, it’s also a place to find out about jobs and openings in decision-making spaces, and stay updated about the myriad of events hosted by the Coalition, our members, and key partner organizations. We’re also working on expanding the functions offered on the Bridges Directory. Potential options include posting resumes, sharing resources for professional development by uploading documents or posting articles, or even using the Groups tool, which functions like an online forum and serves as a space people can collaborate and post discussion topics, photos, and or hold polls!

The Leaders Bridge will be published on a bi-monthly basis and each edition will also provide key leadership and civic engagement opportunities, board openings, and career opportunities. The newsletter features important dates, spotlight one or two current and past participants of the leadership programs, and highlight one of our member organizations and or their staff. If you want to spotlight a Bridges alumni or current cohort member, please contact me via email: Nakisha@coalitiocommunitiescolor.org!

Combined, the Bridges Directory and the Leaders Bridge will deepen connections and transform best practices for engagement between Bridges leaders, staff, and our community partners. Speaking of partners—If you are one of our valued partners or a Bridges leader working with an organization, business, or governmental agency and want to share an event your coordinating, a job opening, make sure you update your Bridges Profile in the Directory and then post your event or job there.

I’m looking forward to learning more about the amazing work of our members, the leadership development programs, and most of all our leaders, staff and partners.


Alumni Spotlights

Carmen Rubio, UNID@S

 Carmen Rubio, Executive Director, Latino Network

Carmen Rubio, Executive Director, Latino Network

Bridges Leaders and supporters may have met Carmen Rubio in her capacity as a transformational leader and Executive Director at Latino Network. She was recently recognized in the Portland Business Journal’s 2018 Women of Influence list! Carmen was a participant of Latino Network’s first cohort of Unid@s leadership development program, she was also its founder! Carmen first explored the development of the program because she had a vision about potential of the collective impact of Latino leaders in Oregon. She realized that Oregon was rich with talented, powerful and influential members of the Latino community and that as the community grows, so should its power, influence and support for one another. So in partnership with other community leaders, Carmen worked to  create a program to unite Latino leaders, to build their collective power, and ultimately to improve the well-being of Oregon’s Latinos.

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One of the most memorable and exciting experiences during the first Unid@s program was her cohort’s production of The Oregon Latin@ List. This heartening video celebrates the childhood stories, values, hopes and lessons that influence the leadership of the first Undid@s cohort. The voices of these leaders and many more continue to be heard as the leadership program is preparing to graduate its 6th cohort this June!

Born and raised in Hillsboro, Oregon, her maternal grandparents worked as Braceros, migrant farmworkers, from Durango, Mexico and were among the first Mexican-American families to settle permanently in the Hillsboro area of Washington County. Carmen was a first generation college student who became increasingly active organizing in student unions like MEChA and student government at the University of Oregon, and volunteering on political campaigns. Her commitment to social justice, advocacy and civic engagement informed her decision to study political science. Upon graduation, she worked for Milagro Theater and Metropolitan Group before joining the campaign as Field Director for a young Latina candidate. She has served as staff for Multnomah County Commissioner Serena Cruz, Portland Mayor Tom Potter, and Portland Commissioner Nick Fish, and she joined Latino Network as its Executive Director in 2009.

Carmen believes that her ability to choose her own career was a privilege due in large part to her family’s choices, she also understands that the choices currently being made impact future generations. Her mission to amplify and advance the strength and courage of the Latino community is fueled by the diversity of leaders, allies and community members who know the value of investing in people and in institutional change for social justice.

Carmen currently serves on the boards of the Oregon Shakespeare Festival, Coalition of Communities of Color and the University of Oregon Alumni Association.  She is a 2015 Marshall Memorial Fellow, an American Leadership Forum of Oregon Fellow, and a member of the International Women’s Forum. She also serves as an appointed Commissioner on the State of Oregon’s Higher Education Coordinating Commission, where she strives to elevate the voices of underrepresented students and students of color enrolled in Oregon’s public colleges and universities.


Robin M. Johnson, African American Leadership Academy Cohort

 Robin M. Johnson, Director of Equity Advancement, Center for Equity and Inclusion

Robin M. Johnson, Director of Equity Advancement, Center for Equity and Inclusion

Bridges leaders and alumni had the opportunity to experience Robin’s leadership in action during her keynote presentation and workshop facilitation at last month’s 4th Annual Bridges Convening. Robin graduated with the first cohort of the African American Leadership Academy (AALA, 2013). While participating in the AALA’s leadership development program, Robin developed a community based project that focused on the gentrification of the historical Black Community and the contributing role of the city’s current and past policies and practices. A clear and memorable learning moment occurred when, as a collective, her PAALF Leadership Program peers committed to understanding their shared and unique experiences through a shared framework and lens.  

Robin cherishes the personal connections developed while participating in AALA, especially because the formation and cultivation of those relationships helped her navigate through institutional racism and overcome barriers she faced as a woman of color. So, as the Director of Equity Avancement with the Center for Equity and Inclusion, Robin continues to build important connections with, between and among her community and organizations. Additionally, she provides executive level coaching to ensure the success of infusing equity broadly and deeply throughout organizations, recognizing the importance of connecting organizational leaders to the development and process of creating their equity and inclusion plans. 

Robin loves that the Coalition’s Bridges Leadership and or AALA Program provides an opportunity for each emerging or refining leader to be immersed in a culturally specific program that fits their unique needs. Personally, she hopes that her development as a leader continues to grow and deepen, and that her perspective continues to be broadened and deepened by linking arms with those around her. 


Coalition, Member & Bridges Events

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Portland United Against Hate (PUAH) Reception and Report to City Council

Please join us in celebrating our successful pilot project and the launch of the next phase of the Coalition's work with a brief celebratory reception directly in advance of our report to City Council on Thursday, May 3rd. We would welcome your presence and support at the Reception (1-2pm) and or at our Report to City Council (2-4pm).

During the reception, there will be food, drinks, a photo booth and we’ll hear a few words from Commissioner Chloe Eudaly! This will be a great opportunity to learn more about PUAH, show your support and network with the coalition’s members. Please RSVP.

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Africa House's 2018 Gala: Growing Strong Together

When: Thursday, May 10th, 2018; 6:00 PM
Where: Melody Ballroom | 615 SE Alder St. Portland, OR 97214
Details: “Growing Strong Together" is an evening of fundraising and celebrating Oregon's African community members! Join us for a cocktail hour, dinner, live auction, and performances from our community members. Purchase Tickets Online. Questions? Interested in sponsorship? Please contact IRCO Development Associate Taylor Gibson at taylorg@irco.org or (971) 271-6423

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Hacienda’s 20th Annual Latino Home Fair

When: Saturday, June 9th, 2018; 10:00 AM to 3:00 PM
Where: Madison High School | 27354 NE 82nd Avenue, Portland OR 97220
Details: Don’t miss out on this great opportunity to take advantage of all the resources CCC member Hacienda has to offer: meet real estate and mortgage professionals, learn more about products and services available to make your home buying experience a success. This is a family-friendly event with a designated kids’ area! For more information, see the Hacienda Website - Facebook Event - or Instagram

CCC's Summer Soirée

When: Tuesday, June 12th, 2018; 5:30PM
Where: Revolution Hall, 1300 SE Stark Street, Portland, OR 97214
Details: Together we're building the power of our communities for racial justice across cultures. Summer Soirée is our chance to come together as one community for an evening of conversation, idea sharing and inspiration.

For questions, contact Kodey Park Bambino at kodey@coalitioncommunitiescolor.org or (503) 200-5722

** For more events listings, visit the Bridges Events Website **


Committee Placement Opportunities

The following opportunities were shared with us by, John Gardner, Director of Diversity & Transit Equity, TriMet Department of Diversity & Transit Equity.

Transit Equity Advisory Committee (TEAC):  TriMet is expanding the membership of TEAC. The Goal of the Transit Equity Advisory Committee (TEAC) is to provide insights, guidance, and recommendations to the General Manager on transit equity, access and inclusion issues. Members advocate for the concerns, issues, and challenges faced by low income, minority, underrepresented, transit dependent and other vulnerable populations they and their organizations represent.  

TEAC provides a forum for the review and discussion of all aspects of TriMet service, including but not limited to service planning, Title VI, Environmental Justice, operational and capital investments, safety, security and workforce.  Interested organizations are encouraged to contact John Gardner for more information.

Safety & Security Advisory Committee: TriMet’s forming a new committee to ensure for greater equity and transparency related to Fare enforcement outcomes. In an effort to improve upon processes and procedures while increasing transparency and working closer with our community stakeholders TriMet is forming a new Safety and Security Advisory Committee (SSAC).  The SSAC is meant to be a broad-based advisory committee authorized by the General Manager.  Working with the TriMet Transit Equity Advisory Committee (TEAC), the SSAC provides guidance to TriMet on issues related to operational safety and security. 

The SSAC analyzes and recommends appropriate changes to policies, procedures, and training for enhancing security throughout the TriMet transit network, including deployment of resources for increased security presence; fare and code enforcement for equitable treatment of low income and historically underrepresented groups, youth and other vulnerable populations; oversight of the Administrative Hearing process for TriMet Code violations; and monitors safety and security performance.  Interested organizations are encouraged to contact John Gardner for more information.

Community Advisory Council (CAC) for the Oregon Health Authority Office of Equity and Inclusion (OHA-OEI): The primary goal of the Community Advisory Council is to center Oregon’s community voices in OEI’s efforts to promote health equity and reduce health disparities. As advocates for vulnerable communities, the Community Advisory Council helps OEI proactively identify and address emerging and ongoing issues and opportunities. CAC members can expect to commit to two hour meetings every other month, with an additional two hours per month outside of meetings. Please see the attached Purpose Statement for more information and for member responsibilities.

The Oregon Health Authority is especially looking for diverse geographic, demographic, and other representation within Oregon. Please complete and return the attached applicationto be considered. Applications and optional demographic sheet (REALD form) are due on Monday, May 21, 2018 at 11:59 pm to Allison Varga, OEI Community Engagement Coordinator (Allison.varga@state.or.us) or (FAX: 971-673-1128).


Leadership Opportunities

CALL FOR PARTICIPATION!

This is a call for participation for BRIDGES alumni and current leadership cohort members to get involved in CCC’s Research Justice programming.  Learn more about CCC’s Research Justice vision here

The following opportunities are for BRIDGES alumni and current leadership cohort members who primarily live, work, and or have spent a significant part of their life in Washington County.

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Leadership opportunities in CCC's Washington County Research Justice project: 

The Coalition has launched a community-based participatory research project about the lived realities of communities of color in Washington County. Part of the project includes the production of a research report that reflects the lives and aspirations of communities of color in Washington County. Each community report will be used to mobilize and advocate for better outcomes for culturally-specific communities in Washington County.     

Community reviewers: if you identify with any of the following communities and want to read the report before publication and provide feedback electronically and or through an in-person session.

Report presenters: CCC Research Justice and Advocacy programs will be coordinating a workshop at the end of May to train community members to testify and present the research findings to city councils, school districts, and others. Please contact Shweta Moorthy by May 15 if you wish to participate in this leadership development opportunity.

Researchers in Regional Equity Atlas: a cohort of 12-15 community members living in Washington County will be resourced and trained through research justice workshops to design and implement small-scale research projects and co-develop an online equity tool along with our partners Ecotrust and 1000 Friends of Oregon starting in July 2018. Please contact Shweta Moorthy by May 15 if you wish to participate in this leadership development opportunity.

 

TRAINING OPPORTUNITY

Equity Facilitation Intensive: Leading conversations for racial equity, diversity and inclusion - Designed for individuals with leading equity, diversity and inclusion efforts within their personal and professional environments. The Center for Equity and Inclusion’s Equity Facilitation Intensive is an opportunity to foster personal growth and develop the facilitation skills-set needed to lead complex and often challenging equity and inclusion conversations, trainings, or coaching sessions. Apply today!

When: July 9-13th, 2018 (9am-5pm); Follow-ups: 8/14, 9/11, 10/9, 11/6, and 12/4 (5:30pm-9pm); Interested applicants should be leading equity work in organizations/communities, have previous training with CEI, or have other relevant experience. Cost: $3,500 per person. Payment plans are available.

If you have any questions and or for application materials, please contact Robin Eisenbach


Career & Funding Opportunities

JOBS & INTERNSHIPS

Portland’s Bureau of Transportation (PBOT) has three job openings!

  1. Vision Zero Management Analyst – This is a data-focused role. Our partners at PBOT would love to secure candidates that have a “research justice” perspective to bring into PBOT. For more information about PBOT’s Vision Zero work and priorities, click here.
  2. Communications + Public Outreach Summer Interns– PBOT is especially interested in working with students and people who have skills in graphic design, web content management and or performing outreach to diverse communities (descriptions of these positions are coming soon, in the meantime, resumes can be forwarded to Irene Schwoeffermann, Public Involvement Coordinator at PBOT).
  3. Seasonal Maintenance Workers – these are entry-level positions that support our construction crews at job sites. On the job training is available and they have the potential to lead to long-term job opportunities!

Potential applicants are encouraged to contact Irene Schwoeffermann to schedule informational interviews.

Senior Coordinator, Community Engagement Program with TriMet
This position will report to the Director of Diversity and Transit Equity and will work across the agency, divisions to leverage capacity and opportunities in partnership with TriMet's Community Engagement Team and staff to ensure agency efforts are effective, authentic, and meaningful. The duties of this position will include supporting ongoing program development, coordinating community and stakeholder engagement, and improving agency efforts to strengthen and expand relationships with key community stakeholders with a focus on transit-dependent populations. 
For more information, see the description for this position on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings website.

Consciousness Raising Equity Facilitator with the Center for Equity and Inclusion
Consciousness Raising Facilitator/Consultants are responsible for raising consciousness, skills and internal capacity to advance equity, diversity, and inclusion within organizations. Facilitators frequently work in interracial teams but may occasionally individually lead workshops/ training for clients. These facilitators require an ability to thrive in a fast-paced, dynamic and engaging atmosphere where learning is paramount, self-reflection is critical and where no one day is ever the same!
For more information, see the description for this position on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Website

Director of Advocacy with Oregon Food Bank
OFB seeks a highly skilled and strategic Director of Advocacy to join the Leadership Team. the Director of Advocacy is the driving force behind OFB’s mission-driven, non-partisan public policy, proposing the agenda and leading a talented team of lobbyists and grassroots advocates to implementation. For more information, see the description for this position on the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Website

** For more job listings, visit the Bridges Jobs and Leadership Openings Website**


Funding

Kaiser Permanente Northwest (KPNW) Community Health Request for Proposal (RFP) Announcement. KPNW works in partnership with hundreds of community organizations to address the health needs and inequities affecting our Northwest neighbors. KPNW has announced a $630,000 Capacity Building Initiative.

Eligibility for this Request for Proposal is limited to nonprofit organizations working on issues that immigrant and refugee communities disproportionately experience. All organizations meeting the general criteria are encouraged to apply. However, priority will be given to organizations that are led by and represent people impacted by the issues that immigrants and/or refugees experience. Successful applicants will be working in the areas of economic opportunity, educational attainment, and access to health care, all key drivers of health. This initiative will support the KPNW service areas in both Washington and Oregon. These counties include:

Washington: Clark, Cowlitz, parts of Wahkiakum* and Skamania* counties.
Oregon: Clackamas, Columbia, Lane, Marion, Multnomah, Polk, Washington, Yamhill and parts of *Linn, and *Benton counties. *Organizations may email community.benefit@kp.orgto verify that they are located in a Kaiser Permanente service area.

Step 1: Submit letter of inquiry via email, a maximum length of three pages per instructions on the template, by 5 p.m. PST on Monday, May 16, 2018. Please e-mail to Community.Benefit@kp.org.

Step 2: Invited applications will be requested to submit a full application. See full RFP for detailed instructions.See attached RFP document and Letter of Inquiry template for full details and guidelines.

Metro Council Candidate Forum

Join the Coalition of Communities of Color and 1000 Friends of Oregon to learn about Metro candidates' vision for our region.Candidates will share their perspectives on how to ensure a community where everyone has access to equitable opportunity in housing, transportation, parks, land use and more.

Monday, April 30th | 7:00-9:00PM

Muslim Educational Trust, Andalusia Room

10330 SW Scholls Ferry Road, Tigard, Oregon

 

Confirmed candidates include:

Lynn Peterson (Metro President); Shirley Craddick (District 1); Joe Buck, Betty Dominguez, and Christine Lewis (District 2); and Dana Carstensen and Juan Carlos Gonzalez (District 4).

March 2018 Equity Lens

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Welcome to the March 2018 edition of the Equity Lens! In this edition we recap a successful legislative session, profile CCC leaders, and highlight the work of our members, partners, and community leaders.

Here's a quick overview of this edition of the Equity Lens:


 SAVE THE DATE: 2018 CCC SUMMER SOIRÉE

SAVE THE DATE: 2018 CCC SUMMER SOIRÉE

Coalition of Communities of Color
Summer Soirée

Tuesday, June 12, 2018

Revolution Hall
1300 SE Stark St.
Portland, OR 97214 

About the Event

Together we’re building the power of our communities for racial justice across cultures. Summer Soirée is our chance to come together as one community for an evening of conversation, idea sharing and inspiration. Join us June 12 at Revolution Hall for a dynamic program, live auction and happy hour, and let us toast to the future of our collective action.


2018 Legislative Recap: How did racial equity fare at the 2018 Oregon Legislature?

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The Legislature adjourned for 2018 on March 3, and while we saw significant progress for racial equity, there is much work to be done in 2019 and beyond. There were multiple victories in housing, along with important new legislation impacting the health and wellbeing of families.

See our earlier legislative recap for more background on these bills here, and our entire 2018 legislative agenda here.

Strengthening Families

Families are at the heart of our communities, and ensuring that children are not unnecessarily removed from their homes, and that families have a path to restoration, is critical to keeping our families strong. This session, Rep. Tawna Sanchez took action to support families as the chief sponsor of HB 4009. As introduced, HB 4009 would have required judicial authorization before a child could be removed by the state, meaning that kids would remain in their homes so long as they were safe. Currently, children of color are removed from their homes by child welfare services at far higher rates. The bill also created an opportunity for children who are waiting to be adopted to be reunified with their families by reinstating parental rights under certain circumstances when it is in the best interest of the child. The final version of the bill only included the second provision.

While we are very disappointed that the removal provision was eliminated from the bill, CCC is dedicated to continuing this conversation to ensure families have the support and resources to thrive. The amended bill passed out of the Legislature, meaning that children will have the chance to be reunified with their families, and we applaud Representative Sanchez’s leadership in passing this critical bill.


Victories in Housing and Health

All of our priorities in housing and health passed this session!

  • Increasing resources for affordable housing: Stable homes are the foundation for strong families and communities. Affordable homes are scarce throughout our state, and families of color are some of the most impacted by rising housing costs. HB 4007 increased the document recording fee and will raise an additional $60 million for affordable homes, emergency rent assistance, and homeownership programs.
  • Addressing racial disparities in homeownership: Homeownership is one of the most effective means to create housing stability and strong communities, and is also the main driver for wealth creation. Communities of color face dramatic disparities in homeownership rates, and the task force established by HB 4010 is a step toward increasing access to homeownership for these families. Thank you to Rep. Mark Meek for his work to advance racial equity in housing.
  • Removing racist restrictive covenants: Restrictive covenants based on race exist in the titles to an untold number of Oregon homes, a stark reminder of our state’s history of legalized racism. While no longer enforceable, the process to remove these covenants is cumbersome. HB 4134 will ease the process to remove these covenants. The impact of these covenants and other ongoing inequities continue to this day.
  • Advancing maternal health: The Legislature passed HB 4133 to establish a maternal mortality and morbidity review committee. African-American mothers face extreme disparities in maternal mortality rates, and this review committee is a step toward improving the health outcomes for mothers of color. Thank you to Representative Janelle Bynum for her work to pass this critical legislation.

Looking to 2019

We are disappointed that a number of priority items were left unfinished this session, and need to be at the top of the Legislature’s agenda for 2019.

  • Early Childhood Equity Fund: HB 4066 would have established a fund to invest in culturally specific early learning programs with proven records of success. These highly effective programs have been left out of the early learning system long enough. Due to the Legislature’s failure to commit resources to these critical programs, children of color across our state will have to wait another year due to the Legislature’s failure to commit resources to these critical programs.
  • Paid family and medical leave: Workers of color are disproportionately impacted by a lack of access to paid leave, and the Legislature must act in 2019 to ensure that workers’ income is protected when they need to care for family members or recover from a serious illness.
  • Small donor elections: A small donor elections program would strengthen democracy by breaking down barriers to running for office and amplifying the voices of Oregonians, including communities of color who face systemic barriers to building wealth.
  • Bold action on climate: This session ended with preliminary steps toward a Clean Energy Jobs program. CCC and its members will continue to push for environmental justice to be at the core of its climate policy.

With the adjournment of the 2018 session, it’s time to begin planning for next year and building power to advance racial equity. Legislators of color took action on urgent issues impacting communities of color and helped center conversations around racial justice. 2018 saw the most diverse group of legislators yet, and we look forward to next year’s long session with legislators of color leading the way to find solutions that will lead to a better Oregon for all of our communities.


The PAALF People's Plan

The PAALF People's Plan lays out a vision of a thriving, empowered Black community and asserts the right of Black people to be in and shape community no matter our neighborhood -- from the North to the Numbers. The plan frames a Black community policy agenda and advances community-initiated projects as a powerful tool for organizing, advocacy, and implementation. The Plan is a result of twenty-six community events, which engaged over 400 Black community members using varied engagement approaches.  PAALF People's Plan is strengths-focused, moving from simply naming issues to collectively building solutions for our community. This represents an empowering transformation in the community engagement process. Learn more at https://www.paalf.org/paalf-peoples-plan/.

The Gordly-Burch Family House

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PAALF also launched a successful project to purchase and preserve the 113-year-old Gordly-Burch family home located at 4511 N. Williams Ave in Portland, Oregon, and establish a cultural center honoring the historic heart of Oregon’s largest African American/Black community.

The property has remained in the Gordly-Burch family since its purchase in 1949. At that time uncensored racial prejudice and antisemitism were pervasive, including racist property laws that prevented African Americans from purchasing homes and redlining that prevented lending to purchase homes. The Gordly family, however, was able to purchase the home from the Jewish residents willing to help root the family in the neighborhood. The home remains an important piece of the family’s history and an important artifact of the racial justice movement from the 1950s to present day. The family members included Mrs. Beatrice and Mr. Fay Gordly, their children-- Avel Gordly, Faye (Gordly) Burch and Tyrone Gordly.

The Gordly-Burch family continues to be a symbol of self-determination in the Black community. The family has a long history of helping to advance community empowerment. Mr. Fay was a railroad worker with the Brotherhood of Sleeping Car Porters and Maids labor group a Mason and active with the A Phillip Randolph movement, and Mrs. Beatrice was a long-time member of Mt. Olivet Baptist church and a Grand Worthy Matron of the Eastern Star.

Faye Burch, previously Governor Barbara Roberts’  Senior Policy Advisor and later serving as the Advocate for Minority and Women- Businesses, She was a co-owner of five gift shops and a small food service restaurant at the Portland International Airport for twelve years while building her business as a Project Development  consultant, business leader, public policy advisor, community activist. In that role, Ms. Burch has coordinated over a Billions of Dollars of opportunities for Minority and Women Businesses and job training programs. Ms. Burch received a Congressional appointment and served on a National Small Business Commission holding hearings in Alaska, Washington, California, and Virginia.  Her business has received several U.S. Small Business Administration awards and recognition in the field of construction as a Woman of Vision and a Newsmaker.

The Honorable Avel Gordly was the first African American woman elected to the Oregon State Senate, representing a geographic area that included the predominantly Black area of North and Northeast Portland from 1991 until her retirement in 2009. Her legislative record included initiatives that focus on cultural competency in education,  physical and mental health, and the administration of justice and the development of legislation that continues to benefit low-income communities of color, young children, the elderly, and other vulnerable Oregonians. She served on state committees including Joint Ways and Means, Education Policy, Trade and Economic Development, and Environmental Quality. She advocated for and then co-chaired former Governor John Kitzhaber’s Task Force on Racial and Ethnic Health and established the nationally recognized Governor’s Environmental Justice Task Force.


CCC Portland Clean Energy Fund

Climate justice and energy democracy has been lifted up as a key priority for our members. For this reason, the Coalition of Communities of Color has endorsed the Portland Clean Energy Fund after serving a key leadership role in its design.

The Portland Clean Energy Fund will provide job training, apprenticeships, and minority contractor support to weatherize and solarize Portland homes and businesses, make energy efficiency upgrades for affordable housing, build clean energy infrastructure, and increase local food production. Funding and initiatives are targeted to ensure opportunities for communities historically left out of the economic engine.

Funding for this work will come from a 1% Business License Surcharge on billion-dollar retail corporations operating in Portland.  We are asking for just 1% from the top 1% to address the pressing issues of racial inequities, growing economic inequality and climate change.

At a time when so many of us have to say NO far too often, this initiative is an opportunity for Portlanders to say YES in a big way. We can serve as a national model in responding to climate change and economic inequities by creating a Just Energy Transition.

Please sign up here to learn more about the Portland Clean Energy Fund!


Asian Allyship in Black Liberation

What is the role of non-Black communities of color as in the movement to dismantle anti-Black racism? How do we organize ourselves and how do we build a new model as comrades and co-strugglers that is different from white model of allyship? Hyejin Shim poses a series of questions for the Asian and Asian American communities that pushes us to think beyond the ‘model minority myth’ to how we understand ourselves and the stories we tell in the context of the movement for Black liberation.

“As discourse on Asian American collusion in anti-blackness & American racism has grown in visibility, I’ve felt glad that more people are talking about Asian American antiblackness & racism, thankful that it’s pushing some more holistic organizing, and also, confused by how it seems that many Asian Americans are shaping their racial justice work through the model of white allyship (which I think many of us agree is ineffective and often more about white people’s feelings than about any substantive challenge to racism).”


Metro Regional Housing Measure

Metro, with assistance from community advisory committees, is developing a potential framework for a housing bond to increase housing stability and affordability throughout the region. After a community engagement process, Metro Council will decide in June whether to refer the bond for the November ballot. The Coalition of Communities of Color has been sitting at the community stakeholder advisory committee, along with a number of CCC members. We are working with our member organizations to ensure that racial equity is at the center of Metro's bond framework.


PROFILE: Djimet Dogo

For us it is also an issue of equity, we want our community to be on board, we should not be left behind when it comes to talking about climate change and climate justice. We have to be at the table.
— Djimet Dogo
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A few months back, The Washington Post ran an article entitled, “The effects of climate change will force millions to migrate. Here’s what this means for human security,” in brief, the article highlights the effects of environmental consequences from climate change on human migration and life. To many, climate change and its effects are a very biological phenomena, affecting plants and animals, ice caps, extinction rates and carbon-storing, to name a few, but for Djimet Dogo, Director of the Immigrant and Refugee Community Organization (IRCO) Africa House, climate change has always been about people, and it is personal. Djimet himself is a refugee, having arrived in the United States from Chad nearly 20 years ago, but he also works with African immigrants and refugees every day at Africa House and sees similarities in their experiences. He explains the role of climate change in driving human migration as such:

 Senate Bill 13 Signing Ceremony with Governor Brown, Native Education Advocates & Tribal Leaders

“In my country [Chad], for instance, there is a progression of desert that is destroying all the farm-land. As nomads move their herds away from the advancing desert they move into the little farmland that is left. This creates conflict between tribes, between groups, and that's how people take sides, become divided; it leads to civil war and people end up as refugees. Climate change has caused drought and desertification and then the economic instability, conflict, and displacement that follows.”

Climate change can be a strong migration force. It drives conflicts around water scarcity due to desertification, disputes over control of (scarce) natural resources, and causes famine and disease. Though climate change can be the driver of larger conflict, it is often invisible, as much to us as to the refugees themselves. Djimet continues, “These conflicts [climate change driven] generate a lot of refugees who end up here [Oregon], but most of them don’t see themselves as being here due to climate change or due to the scarcity of natural resources driven by climate change.”

Djimet explains that there is often minimal discussion around climate change, let alone climate justice, at national levels in many African countries, and that many African immigrants and refugees arrive unfamiliar with U.S climate change rhetoric. This leads to an important solution for Djimet, education.

In 2017, Africa House and the Portland African American Leadership (PAALF) were awarded a grant through Meyer Memorial trust to conduct environmental justice strategic planning, community education and engagement, and advocacy agenda development through their “Afro-Ecology Series.” This process (to be completed in Spring 2018) will result in a strategic environmental justice plan prioritizing actions that reduce and eliminate environmental disparities and ensure the equitable distribution of benefits, including increased economic opportunity and investments. This collaborative effort will result in building and supporting leadership to identify and implement climate solutions. This is the first step to increasing opportunities for Africans and African Americans to build a base and have access to decision-making processes. Africa House, through a Gray Family Foundation grant, has also developed a multigenerational curriculum about climate change to share with African immigrants and refugees and to incorporate into the African Leadership Development Institute, one of CCC’s culturally specific leadership development programs. Africa House hopes to break down perceptions of environment and climate, which are often framed as political rather than spiritual and social.  The environmental movement, Africa House found, should be rooted in self-determination, justice and spiritual connection to mother earth.

Climate (in)justices not only drive displacement from home countries but also affect African immigrants and refugees in Portland and around the State of Oregon. Frontline communities—communities of color, low-income communities, tribes, rural communities, immigrants, and refugees—are hit first and hardest by climate change and the pollutants that cause it. Climate change effects like drought, famine, heat waves, storms, polluted air, and water, expanding deserts, flash floods, etc, dictate so much of what African immigrants and refugees experience. Because climate change impacts immigrants and refugees first and hardest, their voices must be amplified and included in climate change efforts that have long excluded communities of color.

**Africa House, founded in 2006, serves about 5,600 community members from 22 ethnic and cultural backgrounds each year and is staffed by a multicultural team representing 17 ethnicities and speaking 10 languages. Africa House is the only culturally and linguistically specific one-stop center targeting the increasingly diverse and rapidly growing number of African immigrants and refugees living in Oregon. Africa House has received national attention for moving beyond intercultural strife to be the only center serving Africans from every country in the continent.


Welcome, Nakisha Nathan, CCC's New Leadership Development Director!

Nakisha believes that our communities flourish when we work together in mutuality, celebrate our diversity and highlight the development of our leaders as they self-organize, build power, and implement strategies for self-determination, wellness, justice, and prosperity.

Portland is frequently hailed as progressive, environmentally friendly, and socially just. The historical impacts of institutionalized racism and oppression are, however, still felt and supported even now. As a result, we live a city and state that mostly serves white interests and continues to marginalize the diversity of the people living here and ignore the leadership within our communities of color. I’m thrilled to be working with the Coalition and its members who are doing the important work to build power of leaders within their communities. I look forward to supporting our leaders as they become be key participants in the decision-making process.
— Nakisha Nathan, CCC Leadership Development Director

Nakisha’s commitment to advancing social justice stem from spending her formative years living in Panama, Canada, Texas and throughout the United States.  Her exposure to a variety of cultures, injustices, and ecological degradation contributed to her desire to facilitate transformational leadership that honors and celebrates individuals, communities and our natural and built environment.

A few years after graduating from Texas A&M University with a degree in bioenvironmental science, Nakisha began her leadership development journey as a community organizer with Texas Campaign for the Environment, where she and her colleagues generated statewide pressure that helped convince Dell and Apple Computers to establish a free Computer TakeBack program. Later, as a legal assistant for an environmental law firm, she continued to support community leaders who seek to protect their neighborhoods from polluting industries.

In the Summer of 2012, Nakisha moved to Portland and began her studies toward earning a Master of Science degree in Education, with a specialization in Leadership for Sustainability Education from Portland State University. During her time at PSU, she worked as a STEAM Garden Educator, cultivating students’ curiosity and facilitating experiential learning opportunities.

Nakisha joins us after working as a Climate Justice Organizer at Oregon Sierra Club Chapter, as a Community and Environmental Justice Organizer with Neighbors for Clean Air, and as the Program Coordinator for the Organizer-in-Training program at OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon. Nakisha serves as the co-chair of the Portland African American Leadership Forum’s Environmental Justice Committee, and continues to work with OPAL Environmental Justice Oregon and Neighbors for Clean Air as a member of each organizations’ Board of Directors.

When she’s not at work, Nakisha can be found playing a variety of games with her friends and family; camping with her partner and two dogs; photographing Oregon’s natural landscapes, flora and fauna; or, gleefully pursuing her quest to find every member of the Araucaria Araucana species (Monkey Puzzle Tree) in Portland.

Gender Pronouns: She/Her/Hers and They/Them/Their


Bridges Convening 2018: A Meaningful and Informative Cross-Cultural Event

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On Saturday, March 10th, leaders from six culturally specific leadership development programs came together and learned about each other’s values, perspectives, and experiences at CCC’s 4th Annual Bridges Convening. Our keynote speaker and workshop facilitator, Robin Johnson, with the Center for Equity and Inclusion was the highlight of the event. Robin’s presentation balanced insightful information with personal storytelling to illustrate how people recognize the impacts of racism and privilege on their values and become empowered to begin collaborating in coalition with one another. Hopefully, those who were in attendance at the end of the program have had a chance to reflect further on the questions Robin posed at the close of the convening: How has the cycle of empowerment shaped your cross-cultural values? How do you intend to advance social justice or dismantle oppression through your personal work and your collective work?

 African Leadership Development Institute (ALDI)

African Leadership Development Institute (ALDI)

 LEAD for Oregon's Native Communities

LEAD for Oregon's Native Communities

 Asian Pacific Islander Community Leadership Institute (API-CLI)

Asian Pacific Islander Community Leadership Institute (API-CLI)

 African American Leadership Academy (AALF)

African American Leadership Academy (AALF)

 Slavic Leadership Development Project (SLA-LDP)

Slavic Leadership Development Project (SLA-LDP)

 Unid@s for Oregon Latin@ Leadership

Unid@s for Oregon Latin@ Leadership

Participants were thrilled to hear from guest panelists Becca Uherbelau, Laura Vinson, and Mary Moller who joined us from Metro, Lane County, and the Governor Kate Brown’s Office. Panelists spoke and answered questions about how our leaders can take advantage of opportunities and partnerships to increase their influence and access to more decision-making spaces for greater impact.

Over fifty Bridges Directory profiles were updated, and we received valued input from folks about how the directory can further support our leaders. This year’s convening also provided space for people to hear about and provide thoughts on how we lead the way in the creation of a clean energy future for our communities. The discussion included details about the ballot initiative for a Portland Clean Energy Fund that would raise $30 million per year to create solutions for climate justice.

Alumni and current leaders were invited to share their stories and values all throughout the event and the energy felt during these moments of cross-cultural learning and understanding was tangible! We’ve since heard from numerous participants how meaningful it was to hear from leaders in other programs and look forward to creating space for more cross-cultural collaboration. We were all further energized by a brief but joyful performance by Leonid Nosov who played the bayan (accordion) between the two-afternoon sessions. And a dozen of our leaders became spontaneous dancers and musicians during Chata Addy’s comedic, instructional and interactive performance!

Stay tuned to find out more about how this convening will continue to inform our work, and the work of our new Leadership Development Director, Nakisha Nathan. In the meantime, we encourage folks who haven’t done so to update their Bridges Directory Profile!